Canada: Mosque charity “controlled or influenced” by Qatar organization that supports jihad terror

In Islam, zakat — the alms required of every Muslim — can and should be given to further the jihad. So it shouldn’t surprise anyone that there are so many jihad-linked charities.

“Audit of B.C. mosque charity alleges personal spending, ‘relationship’ with Qatar group accused of supporting terror,” by Stewart Bell and Rumina Daya, Global News, September 27, 2017 (thanks to The Religion of Peace):

Two worshippers at the Masjid Al-Hidayah and Islamic Cultural Centre speak with Global News about a Canada Revenue Agency audit that allegedly revealed troubling details about a charity which runs a mosque….

The audit documents released by the CRA further said the Sheikh Eid Bin Muhammad Al-Thani Charity Foundation (Eid Foundation) in oil-rich Qatar had “maintained some level of control or influence over the affairs” of the B.C. charity.

“The organization’s connection to and possible control by the Eid Foundation is particularly concerning given that publicly available information … indicates that the Eid Foundation is alleged to have provided support to terrorism,” the CRA Charities Directorate wrote.

“Our research indicates that the Eid Foundation is a member organization in the Union of Good, a global coalition of Islamic charities operated by Hamas, a listed terrorist entity in Canada,” read the letter.

In May, the CRA said in a “Notice of Penalty” letter that while it had initially proposed a $126,000 penalty for Bahr’s spending, it had decided not to follow through after the Islamic Society said it would remove him from the board and improve its internal controls, financial oversight and record keeping.

But the CRA did impose a $9,000 penalty against the charity for issuing $182,000 worth of donation receipts that were deemed “not compliant.” The letter said the penalty could be paid to another registered charity.

Qatar group was one of several areas of possible non-compliance

No penalty was imposed in relation to charity’s “relationship” with the Qatar group. The Islamic Society’s lawyer, Sebastian Elawny, said the CRA had found no wrongdoing and was satisfied with the charity’s reply to the allegations.

“The organization’s response was clear and the evidence was unequivocal in proving that the organization was not involved in any activities involving terrorism. Had there been any shred of evidence supporting a terrorist financing claim, the CRA would not have permitted the organization to continue to be designated as a registered charity,” he said.

One of four organizations listed on the CRA website as “penalized,” the Islamic Society of B.C. built a mosque with a gym and underground parking that opened in 2003. Recent visitors have included Christy Clark, when she was the B.C. premier, and local MP Ron McKinnon, a Liberal member of the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights. McKinnon’s office said the MP was unaware of the CRA audit and did not know about the sexual assault case against Bahr until July 2016.

“The main issue probably was the personal expenses of the person that was running the organization being mixed up with the organizational expenses,” said Mark Blumberg, an expert in non-profit and charity law who reviewed the CRA documents.

He said the CRA had also expressed concerns about possible terrorist links.

“Canadian charities have to be scrupulous and careful that when they’re dealing with foreign partners that they avoid any even perception that those organizations could be involved with a terrorist organization,” said Blumberg, a partner at Blumberg Segal LLP.

The allegation that the Eid Foundation was “directly involved” in the affairs of a B.C. charity has emerged as Qatar is under diplomatic pressure from its Arab neighbours for allegedly bankrolling groups spreading extremism in the Middle East.

In June, the governments of Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Egypt and Bahrain closed their borders with Qatar and placed dozens of charities and individuals on a terrorist list. The Eid Foundation was among them, the Gulf News and Al Arabiya reported.

Also listed was an alleged Eid Foundation co-founder and ex-board member, Abd al-Rahman al-Nuaymi. The United Nations has identified him as a key financier of Al Qaeda in Syria and Iraq. The Eid Foundation said Nuaymi had not served on its board since 1999.

The Canadian charity’s relationship to the Eid Foundation was one of several areas of possible non-compliance raised by the CRA in its 32-page “preliminary findings” letter. The letter said the Islamic Society’s records “indicate that a 2005 agreement was signed between the organization and the Eid Foundation.” Documents mentioned that two board members would be “from Qatar,” the CRA wrote….

 

 

https://www.jihadwatch.org/2017/09/canada-mosque-charity-controlled-or-influenced-by-qatar-organization-that-supports-jihad-terror

 

Kaepernickitis Is Rooted in Lies

Foolish athletes (and their like-minded playmates) should direct their political and social ire elsewhere. Instead, they’ve joined their Hollywood cohorts as mouthpieces for the Democratic Party.

Take Colin Kaepernick. His failed efforts at protesting during the National Anthem were predicated upon a lie. After his initial protest in the 2016 preseason, NFL Media reported:

“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color,” Kaepernick told NFL Media in an exclusive interview after the game. “To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.”

In other words, Kaepernick has bought the lies of Black Lives Matter hook, line, and sinker. As I noted last year, the lie is this:

There’s widespread and institutionalized racism inside America’s law enforcement agencies, and black Americans are especially targeted. This racism has led to the deaths of a disproportionate number of innocent black Americans. In order to stop this heinous activity, we need more gun control legislation, more wealth redistribution, more job and education programs, and thus Americans need to elect more Democrats.

As has been refuted ad nauseam – most notably by Heather MacDonald – few things are further from the truth. The tragic truth is, the most dangerous place for a black American is not in the presence of a police officer. The most dangerous place for a black American — especially for young black males – is a black neighborhood. Again, as a 2016 report by the Manhattan Institute reveals:

  • In 2013, homicide was the leading cause of death among African-Americans aged 15–35.
  • During 1990–2008, for 93 percent of black homicide victims, the perpetrator was also black.
  • In 2009, in the 75 largest U.S. counties, blacks were charged with 62 percent of robberies, 57 percent of murders, and 45 percent of assaults — despite constituting 15 percent of the population in those counties.
  • In 2014, in New York City, blacks committed 75 percent of shootings and 70 percent of robberies, while constituting 23 percent of the population.
  • During 2005-2014, blacks were also responsible for 40 percent of murders of police officers nationwide.

And perhaps the most shocking statistic of all: Black men in the U.S. are half as likely to die if they are in prison than if they are not. And why are these black neighborhoods so dangerous? Again, the breakdown of the black family.

http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2017/09/kaepernickitis_is_rooted_in_lies.html

 

 

 

THE TRUTH ABOUT POLICE VIOLENCE AGAINST BLACK MEN

http://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/267943/truth-about-police-violence-against-black-men-mark-tapson

 

In the wake of violent protests in St. Louis following the acquittal of white former police officer Jason Stockley for the murder of black suspect Anthony Lamar Smith, a Cornell University doctoral candidate in philosophy has put forth an argument you’re unlikely to hear in the mainstream media. Writing at National Review Online, Philippe Lemoine marshals actual facts and logic to demonstrate that, contrary to received wisdom, black males in the United States do not suffer a disproportionate degree of police brutality.

The largely undisputed narrative about cops and black men goes like this: black males are victimized daily all over America by police harassment and brutality, even when innocent, and there is an epidemic of police shootings of unarmed black men. This narrative is false, says Lemoine, and “distracts from far more serious problems that black Americans face.” Furthermore, the news media acceptance of it “poisons the relations between law enforcement and black communities throughout the country and results in violent protests that destroy property and sometimes even claim lives.”

The reality, Lemoine declares, is that a random black male is “overwhelmingly unlikely” to be the victim of police violence, and any disparity that does exist between the violence blacks and whites experience in their encounter with cops “is consistent with the racial gap in violent crime, suggesting that the role of racial bias is small.”

According to the Washington Post, just 16 unarmed black men out of a population of more than 20 million were killed by the police in 2016 – down from 36 the year before. These figures are numerically comparable to the number of black men that could be struck by lightning in any given year, Lemoine calculates, and they include cases in which the shooting was justified, even if the person killed was unarmed.

“Police killings of black unarmed males are incredibly rare, and it’s completely misleading to talk about an ‘epidemic of them,” he writes, pointing out that the left makes a similar comparison “when they argue that it’s completely irrational to fear that you might become a victim of terrorism.”

It’s not even true that black men are beaten on a regular basis by the police, or even pulled over constantly without reason. Using data from the Police-Public Contact Survey, based on a nationally representative sample of more than 70,000 U.S. residents age 16 or older, Lemoine notes that “black men are less likely than white men to have contact with the police in any given year.” Only 1.5 percent of black men have more than three contacts with the police in any given year, he points out – only marginally more than the 1.2 percent of white men who do.

Actual injuries by the police are so rare that they cannot even be estimated precisely, says Lemoine. “The data suggest that only 0.08 percent of black men are injured by the police each year, approximately the same rate as for white men. A black man is about 44 times as likely to suffer a traffic-related injury.” Again, these figures include instances in which violence is legally justified.

There does exist a racial disparity in the police use of physical force, but this experience is rare for men of all races. Only 0.6 percent of black men experience physical force by the police in any given year, states Lemoine, compared to approximately 0.2 percent of white men. Granted, that is three times as often; however, this disparity is less likely to be the result of racial bias, as people commonly assume, than the fact that black men commit violent crimes at much higher rates than white men do.

Citing data from the National Crime Victimization Survey, Lemoine notes,

that black men are three times as likely to commit violent crimes as white men. To the extent that cops are more likely to use force against people who commit violent crimes, which they surely are, this could easily explain the disparities we have observed in the rates at which the police use force. That’s not to say that bias plays no role; I’m sure it does play one. But it’s unlikely to explain a very large part of the discrepancy.

As for black Americans’ own perceptions of how they are mistreated by the police, Lemoine points out that individuals can be trusted about their own personal experiences, but “when it comes to larger social phenomena,” other factors come into play besides just their personal experience – the media, for example, which is very influential in terms of perpetuating the false narrative about police brutality against blacks. For example, most Americans believe that crime in the U.S. has increased since the 1990s, despite an abundance of information that crime has actually fallen dramatically. “[I]f people of any color can be wrong about this,” reasons Lemoine, “there is no reason to think black people can’t be wrong about the prevalence of police violence against minorities.”

His clear-eyed argument echoes the similarly fact-based presentation of Heather Mac Donald’s recent, essential read, The War on Cops: How the New Attack on Law and Order Makes Everyone Less Safe. That sobering book warns that an “academic victimology industry” and a complicit media have stoked Black Lives Matter hatred of the police and propelled the current “anti-cop narrative to powerful mainstream status.”

Facts may be stubborn things, as John Adams said, but facts alone are not especially effective against a deeply entrenched, cultural narrative protected and promoted by forces such as the media. Smashing that false perception of an epidemic of police violence against black men will take a combination of the facts with an emotionally powerful counter-narrative – and enough minds that are receptive to truth.