Masculine Dads Raise Confident Daughters By Abigail Shrier

From The Wall Street Journal

July 20, 2018 6:39 p.m. ET

The summer I graduated from college, I joined my father one Saturday night at his favorite hangout, Borders Books. Much to my brother’s and my embarrassment, our father treated it like a library. He would seat himself at a table with a muffin in one hand, a stack of books fanned out in front of him, and no intention of leaving within the hour. An amateur singer was torturing a guitar somewhere in the building; tinny strains filtered down to the cafe where we sat.

“You hear that?” I teased. “If you had given me just a little more encouragement with the guitar, that could be me right now.”

He looked up from his book. “That’s right,” he said, his voice gathering in a growl. “I didn’t support it! That’s why my kid’s on her way to graduate school, and that guy’s singing in a Borders!”

My father never hid that he had high expectations of me, for which my tuneless, lackluster attempts with guitar proved pitifully inadequate. He admired smarts less than grit, found surface beauty less enchanting than charm. The woman he admired most was our mother, not for her intelligence or accomplishments, though she had plenty of both, but because of a strength that took his breath away and on which he often relied.

His example has been on my mind these days with all this talk about “toxic masculinity” and the proper ways to raise boys so that they don’t become sexual predators. A recent New York Times article about how to raise good boys in the “#MeToo Era” cites psychologist Peter Glick, who advises parents to challenge the prevailing norms of masculinity with our sons, refraining from using terms like “man up” and—crucially—ending all teaching of chivalry: “We need to stop socializing boys to see women as needing protection.”

So many seem to believe that if we can remake boys as feminists—by which they seem to mean boys who check their male privilege, are unafraid to cry, and are politically progressive—we will have largely solved the problem of sexual harassment. A glance at the public figures felled in the #MeToo purges—not to mention Bill Clinton —should cure us of the idea that progressive politics incline men to better treatment of women.

Masculinity, like femininity, is neither inherently good nor bad. Enormous damage can be inflicted by the sorts of malice we associate with girls: spreading rumors, convincing someone’s friends to turn against her, refusing to acknowledge someone purportedly beneath notice. Femininity and masculinity are manners of comportment and modi operandi; they are not codes of conduct. Men have used masculinity for acts of heroism and decency. That they have also applied it to despicable behavior says nothing of masculinity itself.

My father’s own unapologetic masculinity made us feel secure. It made itself known in the shuffle of his loafers against our linoleum floor, the rumble of his voice, the two-fingered whistle whose sharpness both impressed and alarmed. And yes, he has held plenty of doors. The notion that this signified anything other than courtesy could never persuade me, since its origin, for me, was with him.

There is something regrettable in the way our exclusive focus on boys and men lets young women off the hook. As if women bear no responsibility for their own behavior. As if they are too weak, too emotional, too foolish ever to take care of themselves.

And that is the greatest disappointment of the #MeToo movement, that it has so spectacularly refused to insist that a woman not allow any man to treat her badly. Failed to insist that young women have an individual responsibility to demand better. That they should all agree no job is worth more than their dignity.

My own #MeToo moment came when a professor I hoped would help me launch an academic career asked me to meet him at a hotel. After eight hours of panic, I turned him down. Not because my mother had taught me never to accept such invitations, though she had. Not because feminism instructed that I should use only my intellect to promote my advancement. But because I knew that had I accepted, it would kill my father. To say yes would have irredeemably let him down.

This is a piece of the #MeToo problem rarely discussed: how to raise our daughters so that they possess a hard nugget of faith in their worth, something they are unwilling to dislodge, whatever the price.

There is a scene in the 2017 movie “Molly’s Game,” in which poker impresario Molly Bloom, played by Jessica Chastain, is sitting in the office of her defense attorney, played by Idris Elba. The lawyer has a daughter of his own, Stella, a lovely and talented high-school student whom he burdens with extra homework and lofty expectations. The lawyer turns to Molly and asks: “Do you think I’m being too hard on her?”

Molly replies: “I met a girl when I first moved to L.A. She was 22. Someone arranged through a third party to spend the weekend with her in London. Do you know what she got? . . . A bag. A Chanel bag she wanted.” That was all the girl had traded herself for. “Whatever you’re doing with Stella,” Molly advises, “double it.”

In demanding a lot from his daughter, in other words, the lawyer was teaching her that she was worth a lot too. In life, this would be her best defense.

My father never let me get away with self-pity. Never allowed me to win an argument with tears. He regarded unbridled emotion in place of reason as vaguely pathetic; if I had any chance of prevailing in a discussion, the first thing I needed to do was calm down.

And when young men didn’t like me or were poised to treat me badly, it was my father’s regard that I found myself consulting and relying upon. When a man tries to mistreat a woman—I’m not talking about violence, but the instinct to convey to her that she isn’t worth very much—he is unlikely to get very far with a woman whose father has made her feel that she’s worth a whole lot.

We spend so much time obsessing over inequalities in society. But there is arguably no inequality more unjust or difficult to overcome than that of parentage. We don’t get the parents we deserve, and those of us blessed with good ones wouldn’t trade them for any other unearned privilege. If you want to protect girls, find them good parents, or become them. Dads, whatever you’re doing for your daughters—double it.

Ms. Shrier is a writer living in Los Angeles.

Video shows Harvard research head confronting woman, biracial child

The head of a Harvard-linked research center is being ridiculed as “Sidewalk Susie” after a viral, cringe-worthy video caught the woman trying to order a mom and her biracial child to get away from her home and then condescendingly asking the family if they live in “affordable housing.”

The confrontation happened Saturday in Cambridge when Theresa Lund – executive director of the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative – came out of her apartment to complain about noise allegedly being made by Alyson Laliberte’s toddler on the sidewalk outside the building.

 

Laliberte recorded the confrontation and posted it on Facebook.

“I’m sitting here because you’re preventing my children from sleeping. Would you like me to do that to your kids?” said Lund, wearing a purple T-shirt, running shorts and her hair tied back.

Laliberte answered: “Who is even watching your kids right now. Are you? Cause you’re not, you’re here with me and my kid.”

That’s when Lund, who is white, accused Laliberte of being poor.

“Are you one of the affordable units? Or are you one of the Harvard units?” Lund said in the video that’s been viewed more than 9,500 times by Monday night.

Laliberte kept her cool in the video – but then let Lund have it on Facebook.

“It was totally discriminating and racist of her.. or maybe it was because my daughter is biracial who knows,” Laliberte wrote on Facebook.

“I I have no idea who this woman is and the fact that she thinks she has some kind of authority over me is crazy!”

The incident is the latest in a string of confrontations involving a white person accusing a black person of not belonging in a particular setting.

In an email to the Boston Globe, Lund admitted she behaved poorly.

“I want to be accountable for my actions in a situation where I fell far short of my values and what I expect of myself,” Lund said. “This clearly wasn’t my best moment, and I have work to do to more consistently be my best self.”

The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative bills itself as a research center aimed at “relieving human suffering” brought on by war or disaster.

Lund’s bio was not on the group’s website on Monday night.

https://nypost.com/2018/07/16/video-shows-harvard-research-head-condescending-woman-biracial-child/

20 Großfamilien in Berlin Clans haben die Straßen aufgeteilt

https://www.berliner-zeitung.de/berlin/polizei/20-grossfamilien-in-berlin-clans-haben-die-strassen-aufgeteilt-30986292#

 

Der Schlag kam massiv – und völlig überraschend. Plötzlich standen am vorigen Freitag 40 Finanzermittler des Landeskriminalamtes vor den Türen verschiedener Clanmitglieder. Zwölf Adressen der Großfamilie R. wurden in Berlin durchsucht, eine in Brandenburg. Insgesamt wurden an diesem Tag 77 Immobilien beschlagnahmt – mit einem Gesamtwert von rund zehn Millionen Euro. Finanziert wurden diese Immobilien zumindest zum Großteil mit Geld aus kriminellen Machenschaften, so der Vorwurf. „Sie ahnten nicht, dass wir ihnen auf den Fersen waren“, sagten am Donnerstag Ermittler, als die Durchsuchung bekannt geworden ist. „Die Konspiration ist aufgegangen.“

Schließfächer aufgebrochen

Mitglieder der Großfamilie R. sind bereits seit Jahren der Polizei wegen besonderer Taten bekannt. So brachen sie im Oktober 2014 in eine Filiale der Sparkasse in Mariendorf ein. Sie ließen sich einschließen und brachen innerhalb von zwei Tagen mehr als 100 Schließfächer auf. Beute: knapp zehn Millionen Euro. Bevor sie flüchteten, zündeten sie Gas. Dabei unterlief ihnen allerdings ein folgenschwerer Fehler und die Filiale explodierte.

Einer der Einbrecher, ein 29-Jähriger aus der Familie R. wurde verletzt und verlor Blut. Durch die DNA, die bei der Polizei bereits gespeichert war, kamen die Ermittler dem Mann auf die Spur. Er wurde ein Vierteljahr später auf dem Flughafen Rom erkannt und verhaftet. Der 29-Jährige war mit einem falschen Pass aus der Türkei nach Italien gereist. Kurz darauf wurde er nach Berlin überstellt.

Die Familie R.: Einer von vielen Clans

Auch der Raub einer 100 Kilogramm schweren Goldmünze aus dem Bodemuseum im März vergangenen Jahres soll auf das Konto der Familie R. gehen. Die Münze im Wert von 3,5 Millionen Euro ist bis heute spurlos verschwunden. Im Juni 2017 waren Haftbefehle gegen vier Verdächtige erlassen worden, inzwischen sind zwei Männer wieder auf freiem Fuß.
Zwei Monate später sollen zwei Angehörige der Familie R. einen Mann getötet haben, weil er von dem Clan 100.000 Euro zurück haben wollte, die er der Großfamilie geliehen hatte.

Die Familie R. ist einer von verschiedenen Clans. In Berlin leben nach Schätzungen der Polizei knapp 20 arabische Großfamilien. Ihnen gehören jeweils bis zu 500 Mitglieder an. Zwölf Clans bereiten der Polizei große Probleme, weil sie immer wieder Straftaten innerhalb der organisierten Kriminalität (OK) begehen. Allerdings, so die Polizei, sind nicht alle Familienmitglieder kriminell.

Straßen sind aufgeteilt

Die OK gehört in den Bezirken seit vielen Jahren zur Tagesordnung. Araber, Türken sowie Afrikaner agieren vorrangig im Westen der Stadt. Sie meiden den Osten, weil er ihrer Meinung nach fremdenfeindlich ist. Das stört Russen, Osteuropäer und Asiaten weniger, sagen Ermittler. Einige arabische Clans wohnen in Neukölln und haben dort bestimmte Straßen unter sich aufgeteilt. Die Familienmitglieder verlassen ihren Kiez nur dann, wenn es sein muss, sagen Fahnder. Das Problem ist aber nicht auf Berlin beschränkt. Auch im Ruhrgebiet, in Niedersachsen und Bremen sind die Clans aktiv.

Am schwierigsten für die Ermittler sind die abgeschotteten Familienstrukturen. So kamen etwa die sogenannten Mhallamiye-Kurden in den 80er Jahren aus dem Südosten der Türkei über den Libanon nach Deutschland, meist nach Berlin, Essen und Bremen. Um zu überleben, mussten die Familien zusammenhalten. „Die Großfamilie ist alles und der Rest ist nichts“, beschrieb einmal ein Forscher das Muster.

Kriminalität durch ungeklärten Aufenthaltsstatus

Viele Mitglieder dieser Großfamilien – auch mit palästinensischer oder libanesischer Herkunft – durften in Deutschland nicht arbeiten, weil sie offiziell staatenlos waren und ihr Aufenthaltsstatus ungeklärt war. Kriminalität wurde zu einer Haupteinnahmequelle mancher Clans und ist es bis heute geblieben. Lediglich die Methoden wurden verfeinert. Anstatt mit Erpressung und Totschlag agieren die Clans heute, zunehmend im Immobilienbereich. So auch die Familie R..

Ein Drittel der Verfahren zur organisierten Kriminalität richten sich gegen Mitglieder arabischer Großfamilien, sagen Ermittler im Landeskriminalamt. Aktuelle Zahlen gibt es nicht. Mehr als die Hälfte der Verdächtigen aus diesen Clans habe inzwischen einen deutschen Pass.

Zeugen werden mundtot gemacht

Drogenhandel, Schutzgelderpressung und illegales Glückspiel werfen hohe Gewinne ab. Dazu kommen Überfälle wie vor Jahren auf ein Pokerturnier mitten in Berlin und auf die Schmuckabteilung im KaDeWe.
Der frühere Bezirksbürgermeister von Neukölln, Heinz Buschkowsky (SPD), beschrieb vor Jahren im Fernsehen einmal die Schwierigkeiten der Polizei in ganz Deutschland:

„Sie können da keinen Fremden einschleusen. Zeugen werden ganz schnell mundtot gemacht, mit Gewalt, mit Bedrohungen. Wenn heute acht Leute verhaftet worden sind, heißt das noch lange nicht, dass es auch zu acht Verurteilungen kommt. Geld spielt da überhaupt gar keine Rolle und diese Familien beschäftigen für gewöhnlich die besten Anwaltskanzleien der Stadt.“

Stadtentwicklung gestört

Seine Nachfolgerin Franziska Giffey (SPD), inzwischen Bundesfamilienministerin, sagte damals: „Durch die Machenschaften dieser kriminellen Großfamilien wird (…) die Entwicklung einer Stadt, die Entwicklung eines Bezirks erheblich gestört und dem muss Einhalt geboten werden.“

Ähnlich wie der italienischen Mafia in den 1960er-Jahren in New York wurde inzwischen auch den arabischen Clans in Neukölln ein filmisches Denkmal gesetzt: Die Serie „4 Blocks“ über die Geschäfte und blutigen Machtkämpfe einer Großfamilie lief im Fernsehen und gewann zahlreiche Preise.