Earth Day Founder Murdered, Composted Girlfriend

 

Ira Einhorn was on stage hosting the first Earth Day event at the Fairmount Park in Philadelphia on April 22, 1970. Seven years later, police raided his closet and found the “composted” body of his ex-girlfriend inside a trunk.

A self-proclaimed environmental activist, Einhorn made a name for himself among ecological groups during the 1960s and ’70s by taking on the role of a tie-dye-wearing ecological guru and Philadelphia’s head hippie. With his long beard and gap-toothed smile, Einhorn — who nicknamed himself “Unicorn” because his German-Jewish last name translates to “one horn”  —advocated flower power, peace and free love to his fellow students at the University of Pennsylvania. He also claimed to have helped found Earth Day.

But the charismatic spokesman who helped bring awareness to environmental issues and preached against the Vietnam War — and any violence — had a secret dark side. When his girlfriend of five years, Helen “Holly” Maddux, moved to New York and broke up with him, Einhorn threatened that he would throw her left-behind personal belongings onto the street if she didn’t come back to pick them up.

And so on Sept. 9, 1977, Maddux went back to the apartment that she and Einhorn had shared in Philadelphia to collect her things, and was never seen again. When Philadelphia police questioned Einhorn about her mysterious disappearance several weeks later, he claimed that she had gone out to the neighborhood co-op to buy some tofu and sprouts and never returned.

It wasn’t until 18 months later that investigators searched Einhorn’s apartment after one of his neighbors complained that a reddish-brown, foul-smelling liquid was leaking from the ceiling directly below Einhorn’s bedroom closet. Inside the closet, police found Maddux’s beaten and partially mummified body stuffed into a trunk that had also been packed with Styrofoam, air fresheners and newspapers.

After his arrest, Einhorn jumped bail and spent decades evading authorities by hiding out in Ireland, Sweden, the United Kingdom and France. After 23 years, he was finally extradited to the United States from France and put on trial. Taking the stand in his own defense, Einhorn claimed that his ex-girlfriend had been killed by CIA agents who framed him for the crime because he knew too much about the agency’s paranormal military research. He was convicted of murdering Maddux and is currently serving a life sentence.

Although Einhorn was only the master of ceremonies at the first Earth Day event, he maintains that Earth Day was his idea and that he’s responsible for launching it. Understandably, Earth Day’s organizers have distanced themselves from his name, citing Gaylord Nelson, an environmental activist and former Wisconsin governor and U.S. senator who died in 2005, as Earth Day’s official founder and organizer.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Sen. Gaylord Nelson created Earth Day in the spring of 1970 as a way to bring national awareness to the fact that, at the time, there were no legal or regulatory mechanisms in place to protect the environment. About 20 million participants at various Earth Day events across the U.S. made Earth Day a success, and in December of 1970, Congress authorized the creation of a new federal agency to tackle environmental issues — the EPA.

 

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/42711922/ns/technology_and_science-science/t/earth-day-co-founder-killed-composted-girlfriend/#.WQFV6IgrLIW

THE GREEN CULT’S HOLY WEEK

 

Bruce Thornton is a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center

Hard upon Passover and Easter Week comes the two high holy days for the Green Cult, last Saturday’s Earth Day, and next Saturday’s People’s Climate March. This two-bit nature-worship calls itself “environmentalism,” but like another pseudo-science that ravaged the modern world, Marxism, this “ism” is definitely a “wasm,” its contradictions, hypocrisies, and cognitive incoherence patent. But just as Marx’s poltergeist lives on in various collectivists ideologies, environmentalism exacts a huge cost from those who can least afford it.

Resource management is an obvious imperative for human beings. We are practically and morally obliged to use nature in such a way that we maximize benefits for all people, and leave for those who come after us the resources for maintaining and improving their lives. Our earthly home is not the wild, the untouched nature that excites our romantic sensibilities, but the garden. We develop and improve nature so that people can survive, but also have clean air and water, and find aesthetic pleasure and solace in its beauty. But nature per se has no intrinsic value or meaning. Nature is matter and the laws of physics, literally inhuman and meaningless. It is indifferent to us, this one species of millions, most of which have disappeared. We give meaning and value to nature, because we are conscious of our uniqueness and its necessary end. Thus nature’s importance rests solely on how it sustains and benefits human beings.

Until the modern world and the development of revolutionary technologies that freed us from nature’s cruelty, people rarely idealized nature. The hard task of providing food made our relationship to nature an adversarial one, and our efforts often failed. It wasn’t until improvements in agricultural techniques in the 18th century began to liberate more and more people from this drudgery. As late as the early 20th century the majority of people farmed. Today two people produce food for a hundred. Freed from the harsh and destructive forces of nature, we began to idealize it. Taking for granted a steady supply of abundant, nutritious, and safe food, protected from nature’s daily cruelty and violence, we indulge fantasies of “harmony” with nature, and curse our encroachments on it. We have turned what Joseph Conrad called a “the shackled form of a conquered monster” into a house-pet.

Industrial capitalism, of course, and its soul-killing technologies are the villains responsible for a modern world that pollutes for profit and ravages mother earth. This stance is blatantly hypocritical, since most of us today would not last five minutes without the technologies that have given us clean water, abundant food, and protection from nature’s fury. Idealizing nature is a luxury of the well fed who don’t have to wrestle sustenance from a harsh indifferent environment.

Worse yet, environmentalism has become the ally of post-Marxist leftism, since both find an enemy in free-market capitalism. Raymond Aron explains why: capitalism “has succeeded by means which were not laid down in the revolutionary code. Prosperity, power, the tendency towards uniformity of economic conditions––these results have been achieved by private initiative, by competition, rather than State intervention, in other words by capitalism.” That’s why at every G8, International Monetary Fund, and World Bank protest, the Greenpeace flag can be seen waving side-by-side with the hammer and sickle. Anything that undermines the politico-economic order that kicked Marxism into the dustbin of history is collectivism’s ally.

 

More perniciously, for secularized moderns who have abandoned traditional faith, environmentalism provides an easy, status-rich substitute. Like Christianity, environmentalism provides a meaningful narrative that separates the sheep from the goats, the enlightened, morally superior saved from the greedy, sinful damned. It has an original sin: the industrial capitalism that banished us from our natural garden and subjected us to the alienation of our “air conditioned nightmare.” It has its ritual celebrations like Earth Day, its sacraments like recycling our waste and buying electric cars, and its eschatology: the inevitable destruction of the planet caused by our wanton desecration of nature’s temple. This is the religion taught in our schools every day, even as the Judeo-Christian foundations of our civilization are banished from the classroom.

People can believe what they want, no matter how wacky the faith may be. But environmentalism has disguised itself as science, and as such has managed to create policies harming millions of people across the globe. Rachel Carson’s war against DDT ended up killing millions of Africa who were deprived of the insecticide that controlled malaria-bearing mosquitoes. The reactionary war against GMOs and “Frankenfoods” is preventing peoples in the developing world from feeding more people with less land and pesticides, and denying them nutritional additives in food that could prevent diseases like rickets. And now the “climate change” alarmists’ war on coal makes it harder to electrify those parts of the world still dependent on wood or dung for fuel, the use of which kills four million people a year.

The global warming cult is particularly destructive to economic development. About 1.2 billion in the world people do not have electricity, making it harder to obtain clean water, develop their economies, or even cook their food without damaging their lungs with smoke. In the rich West, the pipe-dream of renewable energy has boosted the cost of electricity, worsening energy poverty in states like California, where a million people spend more than 10 percent of their income on energy. The high cost of gas and electricity because of environmental regulations amounts to a regressive tax on the poor, who are hit the hardest. In sweltering San Joaquin Valley counties like Madera and Tulare, energy poverty rates are 15 percent, compared to 3-4 percent in cool, deep-blue coastal enclaves. Impoverished Kings County averages over $500 a month in electric bills, while tony Marin Country, with an average income twice that of Kings County averages $200.

The final insult of the Green Cult is its claims that science, not gratifying myths, lies behind its destructive policies. The claims of a “scientific consensus” on the truth of human-generated apocalyptic global warming, and the Inquisition conducted against “deniers,” gives the game away. Given that we still don’t completely understand the physical mechanisms that drive global climate, shutting down debate and demanding fealty to orthodoxy are the opposite of real science. Science has become successful by making skepticism its watchword, subjecting hypotheses to rigorous testing and criticism before accepting them as facts. The Salem-like persecution of those acting like scientists and questioning the climate-change hypothesis suggests that science has nothing to do with it. Ideology, status-mongering, or pseudo-religion are more important.

We need to stop recycling old romantic nature-love myths and start thinking about what benefits human beings across the globe. Economic development fueled by carbon-based energy has lifted billions out of poverty and malnutrition, an improvement the selfish rich’s war on carbon is making more difficult. Here at home, worsening energy poverty by regressive taxes, regulatory costs, and sluggish economic growth exacerbates the income inequality that most global-warming alarmists decry.

But the greater irony is that for those who truly care about the environment, making people prosperous is the proven path to taking better care of nature. We improved our environment when we didn’t need all our wealth just to eat another day. The developing world can do the same thing. We just need to stop letting selfish, self-indulgent, well-fed enviro-cultists determine policies whose costs they don’t have to bear.