Leaving The Democratic Plantation

Earlier this week I wrote an article for FrontPage Mag about rap superstar Kanye West’s controversial endorsement of black conservative commentator Candace Owens. Owens had recently issued a clarion call for a black exodus from the Democratic Party, urging blacks to abandon the victim mentality encouraged by the Party and embrace a victor mentality instead. Kanye, whose degree of fame puts him in a rather unique position to have a powerful cultural impact among young voters, tweeted a startling defense of her message. In desperate response, a panicked left unleashed a social media and news media assault on Kanye, questioning not only his allegiance to the black community but even his sanity.

Since that article, the controversy has grown exponentially, with many conservative pundits celebrating (and many others doubting) Kanye’s apparent political revelation, and with many progressive pundits smearing Kanye in an effort to minimize his potentially devastating influence.

But not all of Kanye’s supporters are necessarily conservative. One unusual voice in defense of Kanye’s independent-minded tweetstorm was that of “atonement activist” Shaka Senghor, who went to prison in Michigan for second-degree murder at the age of 19 and served a 19-year sentence, five of them in solitary. He went on to write a memoir titled Writing My Wrongs and to create The Atonement Project “as a means for beginning conversations about reconciliation among those who have committed crimes and those who have felt the impact of crimes.” Part of his work is dedicated to helping young people break out of “self-imposed prisons,” “get out of prison and stay out,” and “avoid the snares of imprisonment.”

Though not a supporter of President Trump, whom Kanye embraces as a friend and a brother in “Dragon Energy,” Senghor posted a short article at Medium.com titled, “Why the Denigration of Kanye West is Bad For Us!” which succinctly sums up why the rapper’s defense of Candace Owens’ message for black Americans is so important, and why the attacks on him are counter-productive for blacks. They are, he writes,

a slap in the face of those who fight daily for the freedom of all people. To call him a coon or question his sanity without employing critical thinking is reckless and irresponsible. To propagate the idea that black people can only think one way is dangerous. A singular narrative that says that we are only allowed to think or say things that make people comfortable impedes our intellectual growth and stymies us emotionally. The belief that we can only align ourselves with one party has left us powerless and without the ability to make politicians work in our best interest, because they take our votes for granted.

There is a social media rush to judgment without about Kanye without engaging in a constructive conversation to see how he arrived at his conclusions. I personally am not a Trump supporter nor do I have blind allegiance to the Democratic Party, that has continued to ignore some of our most pressing issues. I am an advocate of freedom of speech even if I don’t like what you have to say. There are some things I agree with Kanye on like not playing the role of victims when we have an opportunity to be victors.

Senghor goes on to criticize “liberals” who “don’t fight for my liberation” and “social media demagogues” who “snuff out freedom of speech just because they disagree. Instead of bashing Kanye or questioning his mental health, we should be questioning why we go along to get along.”

Senghor urges black Americans to quit “whining and complaining” about Kanye and Trump and to ask these critical questions instead: “What are we doing to empower ourselves, what are we doing to employ ourselves, what are we doing to protect ourselves, what are doing to be fully free?”

Shaka Senghor – and Kanye West, for that matter – may or may not be intentionally urging black Democrats to convert to conservatism, but the fact remains that the very process of answering those questions for themselves will prompt black Democrats to examine what their Party is doing – or more precisely not doing – to empower and protect them. And that is the first step toward abandoning the Democrat plantation.

Read Senghor’s whole short article here.

 

https://www.frontpagemag.com/fpm/270014/leaving-democrat-plantation-mark-tapson

Liberal Democrat Wealthy White Manhattan parents angrily rant against plan to bring more black kids to their schools

https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/num…l-primary-nyc/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United…New_York,_2012

A new effort to diversify schools in the Upper West Side of Manhattan — one of the richest neighborhoods in the city — has drawn an angry reaction from many parents.

Local news station Spectrum News NY 1 has posted a video that shows white parents furiously attacking a plan to require all local middle schools to reserve 25 percent of their seats for students who score below grade level on state English and Math exams.

The plan is an effort to make schools on the Upper West Side more diverse to reflect the demographics of New York as a whole, as the schools in the area now are predominantly white.

“You’re talking about an 11-year-old, you worked your butt off, and you didn’t get that, what you needed or wanted,” one angry woman said during the meeting. “You’re telling them that you’re not going to go to a school that’s going to educate them the same way you’ve been educated. Life sucks!”

Kristen Burger, an elected member of the Upper West Side Parent Council, tells NY 1 that the plan is intended to address diversity problems in the area’s middle schools, which she describes as “very segregated.”

And NY-1’s video shows middle school principal Henry Zymeck telling many of the parents that he feels hurt by some of their comments.

“There are kids that are tremendously disadvantaged,” he said. “And to compare these students and say, ‘My already advantaged kid needs more advantage, they need to be kept away from those kids,’ is tremendously offensive to me.”

https://www.rawstory.com/2018/04/wat…6SaPVw.twitter

“Queen bees” hinder women in the workplace | Up to 58% of workplace bullies are women and they target other women 90% of the time.

 

Queen Bee Syndrome hinders the advancement of women in the workplace, as well as damaging productivity, profit and progress

 

Queen Bees are women in the workplace that treat colleagues in a demoralising, undermining or bullying manner. They should NOT be confused with strong, ambitious women in the workplace (which we applaud). Queen Bees are adult versions of the mean girls from school – but now they have grown up and are more calculating.

So why should we care?

Queen Bee mischief manifests in ways that can have lasting negative effects on individual careers and entire organisations. Since women have “attained a critical mass in the professional and managerial ranks of a significant percentage of companies, especially financial and services organisations,” management should be particularly concerned about issues of abusive conduct by and toward women, Lesley Levin Mary Mattis wrote in their research on corporate response to gender diversity. Hence, Queen Bee Syndrome can be the biggest hindrance to women advancing in the workplace because:

  1. Queen Bees often lack the sponsorship or support necessary to get promoted due to their negative behaviour. Poor leadership negatively impacts organisational performance and profitability.
  2. Queen Bees often prevent other talented, up-and-coming women from advancing in the workplace. Research from the Workplace Bullying Institute has suggested that, as many as 58% of bullies in the workplace are women, and these individuals most often victimise other women. The study found that Queen Bees choose other females as targets nearly 90% of the time.

I recently conducted a survey focused on women in the workplace, and found that approximately 70% had been the victim of either workplace bullying or covert undermining by a female boss. Along with the approximately 70% who had endured “the sting” of the Queen Bee boss, 33% had been on the receiving end of a woman on the same level or below being unhelpful, holding them back or undermining them.

Nicki Crick et al’s research on relational victimisation (2002) proposes that females are not often overtly aggressive with one another, but instead they use their social intelligence to manipulate relationships or damage the reputations of others. These socially aggressive behaviours include gossiping, social exclusion, social isolation, social alienation, talking about someone, and stealing friends or romantic partners. The jury is still out on exactly why Queen Bees exhibit such behaviour. Nearly 75% of the survey respondents thought that Queen Bee behaviour might stem from insecurity, whilst other possible causes include feeling the need to be aggressive in order to be taken seriously, or even Queen Bees desiring to be the only “top” woman.

Queen Bee Syndrome can have a negative impact on organisational performance and bottom line results which can include:

● Reduced productivity
● Reduced employee satisfaction
● Grievances and lawsuits
● Lower profitability

Addressing Queen Bee Syndrome will help companies to improve efforts to advance women in the workplace by (a) allowing women to identify and eliminate behaviours that keep them from obtaining senior positions in the workplace; (b) encouraging women to support each other in the workplace at all levels and leverage one another as allies; and (c) empower managers who are aware of Queen Bee Syndrome to intervene and stop the behaviour.

Management must develop a more complex and realistic image of women that includes recognition of their aggressive tendencies and the form of victimisation females are more likely to use. Addressing Queen Bee Syndrome can result in positive organisational outcomes such as:

● Reducing attrition of strong female talent
● Strengthening the talent pipeline of future leaders
● Improving recruitment efforts due to the supportive environment
● Improved employee morale
● Increased productivity

Cecilia Harvey is an advocate for women in tech and women in leadership. She is the founder and chair of global showcase platform Tech Women Today and the founder of app WalkingRed

https://economia.icaew.com/en/opinion/april-2018/queen-bees-hinder-women-in-the-workplace