Eurodance for today

Dreamland – Anything For U (Eurodance)

 

 

Sinny – Give Me Your Love (Eurodance)

 

Remon – Runaway (Eurodance)

 

Qruizia – Fly To The Sky (Eurodance)

 

Éjszakai Járat – Legyen A Sex (Eurodance)

 

Bee Fun – Night Creature (Eurodance)

 

P.T.B. – Tell Me Why (Eurodance)

 

Tanya Wild – I Remember My Life (Eurodance)

 

Natascha Wright – Lovely Lie (Eurodance)

 

Mister-Y – Wind Of Your Way (Eurodance)

 

Dena – Your Love Is Here To Stay (Eurodance)

 

Karina – Let Me Care Of You

 

4 U – European Spirit Man (Eurodance)

 

K2 – Weihnacten In Den Bergen (Eurodance)

 

Lian Ross – Keep This Feeling (Italo Mix) (1994)

 

 Echo Bass – Gotta Dance With The Music ♫ (℗1994)

 

 

Magic Beat – Loodan et jääd.

 

 

Magic Beat – Kõik Mis Olnud

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SNC-Lavalin looking to partially sell investment in Highway 407

SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. says it is looking to sell a portion of its investment in the Highway 407 toll highway outside of Toronto that analysts estimate could fetch more than $2 billion.

The Montreal-based engineering and construction firm said Thursday that it has hired CIBC Capital Markets and RBC Capital Markets to help advise it on a potential sale of 6.76 per cent of its investment through a direct sale or other type of transaction.

The sale would leave SNC-Lavalin with a 10 per cent stake, alongside co-owners Spanish multinational Cintra Infraestructuras and the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board.

The company, which previously mused about selling the investment, believes it could be a good time to consider the transaction. Determination of how the proceeds would be used will be made at the time of a transaction.

A sale would help investors to value the company’s core business more accurately, it said in a news release.

Yuri Lynk of Canaccord Genuity said the decision’s timing is strange, since it comes before SNC-Lavalin is able to enter into a deferred prosecution agreement to settle past wrongdoing.

Under a DPA, criminal prosecution is suspended if the accused admits guilt, pays a significant fine, puts safeguards in place and co-operates with authorities. Upon completion, the charges are withdrawn.

SNC-Lavalin has pleaded not guilty to the one fraud and one corruption charge filed by the RCMP against it and two of its subsidiaries.

The RCMP alleges SNC-Lavalin paid nearly $47.7 million to public officials in Libya and defrauded various Libyan organizations of about $129.8 million.

A preliminary hearing is slated to begin in September. The company said the actions were taken by executives who are no longer with the company and who face criminal charges.

The highway’s potential partial sale overshadowed SNC-Lavalin’s second-quarter results.

The company said it earned $83 million or 47 cents per diluted share, down from $136.4 million or 91 cents per share a year earlier.

The profit included $88 million to settle a 2012 class action lawsuit and a $62.7-million net gain from the sale of its investments in Montreal’s McGill University Health Centre and SNC-Lavalin Infrastructure Partners.

Adjusted profits increased to $154.9 million or 88 cents per share, up from $107.8 million or 72 cents per share in the prior year. Adjusted earnings for the engineering and construction operations were 65 cents per share, six cents ahead of analyst expectations.

Revenue increased 30 per cent to $2.5 billion, short of the $2.6 billion forecast by analysts polled by Thomson Reuters Eikon.

SNC-Lavalin’s backlog was $15.2 billion, up from $10.4 billion six months earlier.

https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/snc-lavalin-looking-to-partially-sell-investment-in-highway-407-1.4038501

 

Bachelorette contender accused of sexual harassment by SOMEONE HE NEVER MET

Former “Bachelor” contestant Bekah Martinez is accusing recent “Bachelorette” contestant Leandro “Leo” Dottavio of sexual harassment.

Martinez, 23, took to Instagram Wednesday to post a series of screenshots she collected from her fanbase, all of which claim the 31-year-old Dottavio acted inappropriately toward women.

The screenshots begin with an Instagram post by Dottavio, dating back about four years, saying “you need my big d–k.”

Martinez discovered the screenshot when browsing Bachelor and Bachelorette Reddit pages. She says that the screenshot of the comment has been floating around online since May. Dottavio told The Post that the screenshot of his comment is photoshopped, and was asking his lawyer to look into it. Martinez says she has seen multiple versions of this comment and believes it is real.

After Martinez shared it, many women responded by sharing what they say were their own experiences.

“I started posting the screenshots [of their messages] because to me, it’s not a coincidence that multiple women would be saying similar things about the same person, Martinez tells The Post. “There’s no way these women happen to be lying about the same thing before seeing what other women are saying.”

One Instagram user who claims to have attended college with Dottavio and performed in theater productions with him there says he’d acted “creepy” to her and other women, some of them, she charged, “barely legal.”

Another user says Dottavio constantly pursued her friend and sent her multiple “unwanted” pictures of his genitals.

Martinez says she received about a dozen messages detailing “specific examples” of sexual harassment but has shielded the identity of Dottavio’s accusers.

She also posted a video saying his lawyer has reached out to her to remove her posts and issue a public apology or be sued for defamation.

Dottavio, a stuntman, appeared on the current season of “Bachelorette” vying for Becca Kufrin’s heart, which he didn’t win. Promos for the upcoming season of “Bachelor in Paradise” show Dottavio, though he is not part of ABC’s official cast announcement.

Martinez and Dottavio have never met. But she says, “hearing first hand from other cast members about his behavior definitely did not lend to his character.”

Dottavio has since responded to Martinez through Instagram with graphic claims from his own followers about her, all of which she denies. “[His response] is so toxic,” she says. “This is why women don’t come forward.”

Martinez, a nanny and Instagram personality, appeared on the most recent season of “Bachelor,” which featured Kufrin and Arie Luyendyk. She’s called out other players in the “Bachelor” universe for their off-screen behavior.

A representative for ABC says they have no comment on the allegations.

 

https://nypost.com/2018/08/02/bachelor-contestant-accuses-bachelorette-contender-of-sexual-harassment/?utm_source=reddit.com

#MeToo Backlash In Corporate Canada Sees Women Locked Out

TORONTO — A lawyer is asked whether a male executive should leave the door open when meeting with a woman.

A consultant’s longtime male client will only take a meeting with her if someone else is in the room.

A public relations executive hears from senior business leaders who say they are shying away from mentoring young women.

The revelations relayed to The Canadian Press about being a woman in corporate Canada in recent months offer a glimpse into a male-dominated workforce that is quietly grappling with the unintended consequences of the Me Too movement.

The movement emerged late last year following a slew of sexual misconduct allegations against film industry heavyweight Harvey Weinstein and other high profile American businessmen. Allegations of inappropriate behaviour have spread to a range of sectors north of the border as well — from politics to theatre to sports — but leaders in corporate Canada have so far been left unscathed.

 

Still, women in business say they are facing a resulting “chilling effect” on their relationships with male colleagues and supervisors.

They reported a noticeable decline in invitations to meetings, business trips and dinners — gatherings considered invaluable for career advancement.

More importantly, they added, senior executives are increasingly hesitant to mentor female employees.

 

t is a development that poses a threat to women who aim to rise to the highest corporate roles at a time when two-thirds of the companies included on the TSX 60 index of Canada’s largest companies did not include a single woman among top earners last year, according to a Canadian Press analysis.

Most of the dozen women who spoke with The Canadian Press were hesitant to discuss the unintended consequences of Me Too because they didn’t want to detract from the progress they hope the movement will make towards improving opportunities for women.

They fear the misguided actions of some male leaders could instead reinforce the door to the old boys’ club, further hindering the hard-fought progress made by the few women able to climb to the top of the corporate ladder.

Chaperones at business meetings

Lori McIntosh flew to Miami in early spring to meet with a client of 12 years, only to be told the company no longer allows its executives to take meetings alone, including with her.

The founder of business consulting and executive search company Vim and Vixin said she agreed to the new terms because “business is business” and she was determined not to let the policy stand in the way of her company or career.

“It is the new reality, but why should having someone in the room with me and the CEO hold me back?”

Toronto employment lawyer Sunira Chaudhri has fielded an increasing number of calls from her corporate clients worried about sexual harassment in their workplace — mostly from those wondering whether they need to change policies around co-ed one-on-one meetings, mentorship, office parties, business trips and dinners.

 

“Some asked, ‘Should we be having the boardroom door open if it is just me and a female alone in a room?'” Chaudhri said.

“Holiday parties were a huge issue too and of course, business travel is big as well because often you are sitting side-by-side 12 to 16 hours a day and you are not just working together, you are eating together, you are staying at the same hotel, consuming alcohol, entertaining clients, it can make for a very intimate scenario.”

While Chaudhri has seen some workplaces show concern around how they should be handling business travel or dinners after Me Too, she said many small- and medium-sized workplaces don’t have the resources to formally train workers and managers around handling sexual harassment or office dynamics.

Others, she said, simply don’t have the nerve.

“Forget about serious misconduct. Employers are still afraid about confronting that person that shows up at 9:05 every day, when they are supposed to be in at nine.”

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2018/08/02/metoo-backlash-corporate-canada_a_23494668/

Forced to share a room with transgender woman in Toronto shelter, sex abuse victim files human rights complaint

denying biological facts and reality have consequences

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/kristi-hanna-human-rights-complaint-transgender-woman-toronto-shelter

A woman has filed a human rights complaint against a Toronto shelter for female recovering addicts, claiming staff forced her to share a small double room with a pre-operative male-to-female transgender person.

The formal complaint against the Jean Tweed Centre, which runs Palmerston House, followed Kristi Hanna’s efforts to inquire about her own legal rights in this unusual situation, only to be told by Ontario’s Human Rights Legal Support Centre that, by describing her new roommate as a “man,” Hanna was the one engaged in illegal discrimination.

Hanna, 37, is a former paramedic who has lately worked in the service industry, and has been struggling with the lingering effects of sexual abuse and resulting problems with addiction to alcohol and cocaine. She described herself as an “active ally in the LGBTQ community,” but said this conflict has left her feeling as if vulnerable women are unable to voice their own gender-based rights for fear of violating someone else’s.

“It’s affecting everyone in the house. This can completely ruin your recovery, let alone your safety, let alone your life,” Hanna said in an interview.

She spent two nights sharing the room — constantly looking over to make sure her roommate was still in bed, she said — before taking an indefinite leave from the shelter. Hanna had lived for seven months at the central Toronto facility, located in an old Victorian house, but since last week has been staying with friends on couches, as a “transient,” she said. “Those two nights were hell for me.”

 

In her formal complaint to the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, Hanna alleges the shelter “admitted a male bodied transgender into the safety of my home, bedroom and safe spaces.” She claims this has caused her stress, anxiety, rape flashbacks, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and sleep deprivation.

“We were all choked by our own anxiety, our crippling PTSD symptoms. You could cut the tension in the house,” she said. She described other women having rape flashbacks, threatening suicide, and one requiring hospitalization.

Lucy Hume, the outgoing executive director of the Jean Tweed Centre said her agency is “fully aware of the requirements under the Ontario Human Rights Code and are well known for our work in providing trauma-informed care across our programs.”

“With respect to accommodating trans women, we do not discriminate; nor do we impose modifications with respect to accommodation,” Hume said in a written statement to the National Post. “We do, however, do our best to meet the needs of all parties affected in a way that complies with the requirements of shelter standards and trauma-informed practice.”

The dispute began in mid-July, when the transgender woman arrived and, according to Hanna, was acting odd and failed a sobriety test. Residents must be clean for a month before they are admitted. After some time in detox, the trans woman was admitted July 20 and assigned to Hanna’s bedroom, a double room with beds about five feet apart.

 

Hanna said the woman is in her late 20s, has facial hair, chest hair, and wears large black combat boots that “trigger” her with their thumping. She said at one communal dinner, the roommate talked about having had a wife in the past, and a pregnant fiancée, and was overheard talking about some unidentified women as “hot” and expressing her preference for Latina women. Hanna said her mannerisms came across as “piggish” and inappropriate.

The Post was unable to contact the trans woman on Thursday.

Hanna said she told staff this person made her feel vulnerable and scared, a view she shared with other residents, some of whom signed a petition to staff.

“All of us were completely upset and flabbergasted, pretty much, and instantly all full of fear. They won’t even allow a man on the property without permission by the staff and all the residents. And we had no pre-warning of any of this. There was never any discussions. It was never mentioned. We were all just blindsided,” Hanna said. “Everyone in the house has had at some point male-enforced trauma. This is not about discrimination, this is about the safety of male-enforced trauma victims.”

She said shelter staff told her: “We’re all about inclusion and it’s unfortunate that you feel this way… Deal with it or leave.”

She was offered the alternative of moving to a room that, because it leads to a fire escape, does not even have a door that closes. She declined.

With the help of a family friend, she inquired about her own rights with the Human Rights Legal Support Centre, which provides guidance to potential human rights complainants.

Her friend, Peta Nankivell, described Hanna as “brash,” and said that in the phone call she was angry and under stress, and used male pronouns to emphasize her objections. That led the advisor to end the call, concerned that it was in fact Hanna who was violating human rights law by her words and behaviour — which could lead the roommate to file a complaint of her own, putting the Centre in a conflict of interest.

“What you’ve told me is potentially discriminatory and potentially a violation of the law, and that individual may file against you in the future, and our role is to keep those conflicts of interest in mind,” the advisor said. No one from the Centre was available to comment Thursday.

Renu Mandhane, Chief Commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission, said that as a general rule, women’s shelters have the right to restrict their accommodation to women.

“A trans person should have access to the shelter that matches their lived gender identity,” she said in a statement to the Post. “However, this does not necessarily require that a cis and trans woman share the same bedroom. An appropriate balancing of the rights of both women may require that one of the women be provided with non-shared accommodation.”

The Ontario Human Rights Code says everyone has a right to equal treatment with respect to services and occupation of accommodation without discrimination because of various grounds, including gender identity and expression. It also says everyone who occupies accommodation has a right to freedom from harassment by other occupants because of the same grounds.

……………………

Flashback to 2017 – A woman raised concerns about sharing a room with a man at a women’s shelter in Kelowna, B.C. Soon later two women were banned and he was allowed to stay. How did this happen? Here’s a video from March 2017 recalling the events.

https://youtu.be/jyRWEt-hKks