Air Canada says mobile app breach may affect up to 20,000 customers

Some 20,000 Air Canada customers woke up Wednesday to learn their personal information may have been compromised after a breach in the airline’s mobile app, which prompted a lock-down on all 1.7 million accounts until their passwords could be changed.

Air Canada said it detected unusual login activity between Aug. 22 and Aug. 24 and tried to block the hacking attempt, locking the app accounts as an additional measure, according to a notice on its website.

Mobile app users received an email Wednesday morning alerting them as to whether their account had been affected.

The app stores basic information including a user’s name, email and phone number.

 

Any credit card data is encrypted and would be protected from a breach, Air Canada said.

But Aeroplan numbers, passport numbers, birth dates, nationalities and countries of residence could have been accessed if users saved them in their account profile, the company said.

Air Canada declined to respond to questions, referring The Canadian Press to its website.

The risk of a third party obtaining a passport in someone else’s name is low if the user still has their passport and supporting documents, according to the federal government.

Users can reactivate their account along stricter password guidelines by following instructions emailed to them or prompts when logging in.

Some users reported problems with the process on social media, likely due to the volume of customers trying to unlock their account.

Air Canada advised anyone looking to access the app to keep trying.

In March, the airline said some customers who booked hotels through its former travel partner Orbitz may have had their personal data stolen.

Nearly 2,300 bookings through Air Canada hotel options could have been involved in a data breach of hundreds of thousands of records that Orbitz reported earlier this year, Air Canada said.

The Expedia-owned travel website operator, whose platform Air Canada no longer uses, disclosed on March 20 that hackers may have accessed personal information from about 880,000 payment cards in 2016.

https://www.680news.com/2018/08/29/air-canada-mobile-app-breach/

 

‘Widespread’ seafood mislabelling at retailers, restaurants, study finds

https://www.680news.com/2018/08/28/widespread-seafood-mislabelling-retailers-restaurants-study-finds/

When consumers buy butterfish or white tuna at a grocery store they may instead receive a fish dubbed “the laxative of the sea,” according to an investigation into seafood fraud that found nearly half of seafood samples it tested at Canadian grocery stores and restaurants were wrongly labelled.

“The results show widespread mislabelling,” said Julia Levin, seafood fraud campaigner for advocacy group Oceana Canada, which conducted the study.

It collected 382 samples of snapper, sea bass, sole and other fish that other studies indicate are often substituted. They chose samples from 177 retailers and restaurants in five Canadian cities.

Scientists at Tru-ID, a Guelph, Ont.-based lab, used DNA barcoding to determine the species of fish. That was compared to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s Fish List, which contains acceptable market names for various fish species.

They found 44 per cent of the fish were not what the label claimed — 52 per cent of the time in restaurants and 22 per cent of the time at retailers, including grocery stores and markets.

Snapper, yellowtail and butterfish were mislabelled 100 per cent of the time, according to the study. Half of the sea bass samples were wrongly identified, while more than 30 per cent of cod, halibut, tuna and sole samples were mislabelled.

Such practices can harm consumer health and wallets, as well as hurt the environment, the report claims.

Most often the fish turned out to be escolar, tilapia or Japanese amberjack.

The CFIA, which is responsible for mitigating food safety risks and monitors food fraud in the country, says it is in the process of modernizing the way food is labelled in Canada.

“The Safe Food for Canadian Regulations will improve traceability requirements throughout the supply chain, including for seafood products,” spokesman Brian Naud wrote in an email.

He said food fraud occurs around the world and is mostly driven by economic gain. Canadian food laws make it illegal to misrepresent a food.

The CFIA found that 13 per cent of the 304 fish samples tested for species authenticity since April, 2014, were unsatisfactory.

A recent publication by the University of Guelph’s Biodiversity Institute of Ontario and the CFIA showed mislabelling occurred in 14.8 per cent of samples tested between 2013 and 2016 using DNA barcoding, Naud added.

Previous studies based on retail sampling found mislabelling was greater than CFIA results but less than identified by Oceana.

Seafood is susceptible to food fraud because of a complicated global supply chain that has opportunities for mislabelling at many stages from the fishing boat to the restaurant or store.

While some mislabelling happens accidentally, Levin said, the majority appears to be deliberate. She stressed the restaurants or stores where the samples were collected are not necessarily the ones responsible for misguiding consumers and may instead be victims themselves.

“Economic profit is the primary driver,” she said, noting the pattern is for more expensive fish, like red snapper, to be replaced with a cheaper alternative, like tilapia.

Industry insiders often try to convince Robert Hanner, an associate professor at the University of Guelph whose lab tested the samples, that the problem amounts to no more than random mix ups: a confused employee laying out fish under an incorrect label.

“If it were purely random, you would expect that once in a while you’d get the good stuff when your’e paying for the cheap stuff,” said Hanner, whose lab demonstrated the first use of DNA barcoding to show seafood fraud in Canada about a decade ago.

“There’s no evidence that that ever happens.”

This means shoppers pay higher prices for lower value fish, and may unknowingly consume harmful products, like escolar that can cause diarrhea, vomiting and other stomach problems. People living with allergies are especially vulnerable.

People may also mislabel seafood to mask illegally caught fish, Levin said. When this happens, it hampers efforts to curb overfishing and protect at-risk areas, among other things, according to the report, which adds illegal fishing is often linked to troubling practices like modern slavery and child labour.

Restaurants Canada’s James Rilett said he was surprised to see Oceana Canada found 52 per cent mislabelling in its restaurant samples when the CFIA’s figures are so much lower.

Still, “any level of mislabelling is concerning,” said the not-for-profit industry association’s vice-president for central Canada.

Restaurants Canada works with partners like Ocean Wise — a program that lends its symbol to what it deems sustainable seafood choices — to educate its members on how to avoid mislabelling, he said.

Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing is a global problem that hurts everyone, said Paul Lansbergen, president of the Fisheries Council of Canada, a non-profit trade association that calls itself “the voice of Canada’s fish and seafood industry.”

However, this type of report into seafood fraud is not new, he wrote in an email.

“I find it unfortunate that Oceana Canada continues to exaggerate what is a rare occurrence in the overall market,” Lansbergen said, adding the study and others like it “are designed to arrive at a pre-determined outcome.”

Oceana Canada wants the federal government to increase labelling requirements to match those in the European Union. In the EU, labels must show the fish’s scientific species name, catch method, and origin — among other information. It also requires catch documentation. Studies show that seafood fraud rates appear to have fallen since the union implemented the more stringent labelling practices.

“We need Canada to implement a traceability system to keep everyone accountable.”

Q Analyst Meets Trump, Mockingbirds Lie, Deep State Roils

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRXQoZOU8g4

Alt-media and Q analyst Lionel meets President Trump in the Oval office, the Mockingbird mainstream media continues to LIE about the fake dossier and cover up for crooked Hillary, and the Deep State, personified by former CIA Director and traitor John Brennan, roils. Thanks for joining us for this important REAL news update.

 

Texas Teacher’s Aide Gets 60 Years for Repeatedly Raping 11-Year-Old

teach female teachers not to rape

https://www.breitbart.com/texas/2018/08/27/texas-teachers-aide-gets-60-years-for-repeatedly-raping-11-year-old/

A North Texas teacher’s aide was sentenced to 60 years in prison with no chance of parole for repeatedly raping an 11-year-old boy in the same school district.

On Friday, Dallas County District Attorney Faith Johnson announced a jury handed down a 60 year jail sentence to Jessica Jewel Corin Benton, a former Mesquite Independent School District teacher’s aide convicted of multiple sexual assaults on the male minor.

The arrest warrant in this 2016 case stated that Benton and the boy had sexual relations approximately 10 times, according to WFAA. None of the sexual acts occurred on school property. One incident was cited as having occurred at a private residence.

Two years ago, Benton, then 26, was arrested and charged with the continuous sexual abuse of the 11-year-old boy. The victim was not her student and attended another school in Mesquite ISD. The two engaged in sex acts between May 2016 and August 2016. Benton worked at Tisinger Elementary and was employed by the school district since August 2015.

The Mesquite News reported local law enforcement only learned about the inappropriate relationship between Benton and the boy because another child, who witnessed the improper conduct, bravely came forward and reported it to his mother. She alerted Mesquite police.

During the investigation, Mesquite ISD placed Benton on administrative leave. Ultimately, Benton admitted to detectives she had sex with the boy. They took her into custody on $150,000 bail and charged her with continuous aggravated sexual assaults.

At the time, Mesquite ISD officials released a statement regarding Benton’s arrest. They said Mesquite police notified the school district about the allegations and charges lodged against the teacher’s aide. “Such behavior by an educator is unacceptable and will not be tolerated in MISD,” the district stated, in part.

Last week, Benton’s trial ran from August 21 to August 23 in Dallas County Criminal Court. Jurors heard testimony from the victim’s therapist and family. On Thursday, the jury reached a guilty verdict in less than 30 minutes of deliberation. They moved onto the sentencing phase. Benton faced 25 years to life imprisonment. On Friday, jurors returned to her a punishment of 60 years without the possibility of parole.

Following the sentencing, Dallas County D.A. Johnson released a statement. “Even though we have a dedicated Crimes Against Children unit within the District Attorney’s Office and we work with Children’s Advocacy Center and other law enforcement officials across the country, it took a small child with true courage to speak up on behalf of another child to get this investigation started,” said Johnson. “This verdict should send a strong message, especially with students returning back to school this week that crimes against children will be prosecuted by the DA’s office to the fullest extent of the law.”

Assistant D.A. Reynie Tinajero thanked Detective Brandon Snyder with the Mesquite Police Department and all of the investigators involved in this case for their meticulous work. He stated, “I am grateful for the dedication and detailed work of Detective Brandon Snyder with the Mesquite Police Department and all the investigators involved. Their work in immediately gathering and securing DNA and other valuable evidence assisted greatly in the prosecution of this case.”