School would not renew man’s contract because they preferred a woman to fill the position. He wins $41,000 in discrimination suit.

Park School of Baltimore will pay $41,000 to settle a sex discrimination lawsuit filed on behalf of a former male softball coach who says he was let go because the school wanted a female coach instead.The Pikesville private school will also implement a policy prohibiting gender discrimination and provide training on federal anti-discrimination laws, according to a Tuesday news release from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which filed the suit.The Park School hired Richard Schneider as head softball coach in the spring of 2014, according to the lawsuit, and renewed his contract in 2015 and 2016. But the next year — despite a satisfactory job performance — the school told the coach it would not renew his contract for the 2017 softball season because of its “preference for female leadership,” the lawsuit said.The EEOC argues this alleged conduct violated Title VII, which prohibits sex-based discrimination.“Title VII protects both men and women from unequal treatment based on gender,” EEOC Regional Attorney Debra M. Lawrence said in a statement. “We are pleased the Park School worked with us to resolve this quickly, fairly and without incurring unnecessary litigation expenses.”

http://archive.is/rlE63

Why Black Men SHOULDN’T Be Mad At The Ancestry Slave Commercial

https://people.uwec.edu/ivogeler/w188/south/charles/charles3.htm

The majority of urban black slaveowners were women. In 1820, free black women represented 68 percent of heads of households and 70 percent of slaveholding heads of colored households. The large percentage of black women slaveowners is explained by the combined effects of manumission (being freed by their white masters for whom they fathered children), inheritance (receiving slaves from their white masters, relatives, and even husbands who had a higher mortality rate than women), and personal industry once they were free (buying slaves themselves).

Black women were the majority of slaves emancipated by white slave owning men with whom they had had sexual relations. The miscegenous nature of South Carolina society is nowhere better revealed than by the fact that 33 percent of all the recorded colonial manumissions were mulatto children and 75 percent of all adult manumissions were females. If homosexual relations existed between black male slaves and their white masters, these relations were not directly acknowledged through emancipation. By 1830 in Charleston, 65 percent of black slaveowners bought slaves for profit rather than to free family members, as indicated in registered documents. Black slaveowners often owned family members and slaves that they used in their businesses, but only 8 percent of black slaveowners who recorded slave transactions were purely benevolent masters–buying a slave’s family members, such as their spouses, children, and other relatives.