Wyoming employer settles to prevent trial on forcing worker into Scientology

Back in December 2018, we posted a federal complaint filed by a woman in Wyoming named Julie L. Rohrbacher, who was suing her former employer, Teton Therapy, for trying to force her into Scientology courses.

As we noted then, this was not an unusual situation. Every several months we seem to hear about a chiropractor or dentist or veterinarian forcing L. Ron Hubbard material on their employees. And that’s no accident — Scientology targets those professions in a front group it calls WISE, for World Institute of Scientology Enterprises.

In this case, Rohrbacher was hired in 2011 to be a receptionist for Teton Therapy, but then was told she had to complete something called “Breaking the Code,” which was based on material from L. Ron Hubbard, and she was encouraged to go to Scientology’s spiritual mecca, the Flag Land Base in Clearwater, Florida, for additional training if she wanted to be considered for management. When she refused, she was fired.

Today, Rohrbacher’s attorney Steven Murray announced that Teton Therapy settled on January 2 to avoid a January 6 trial.

Like with Laura DeCrescenzo in her lawsuit against Scientology itself, Rohrbacher’s case had survived an attempt by Teton Therapy to have the lawsuit dismissed with a motion for summary judgment, but after an early December hearing, that motion was dismissed and trial loomed.

“To win summary judgment was significant in that venue,” Murray told us today in a telephone call. He says that Teton Therapy was a well known name, a firm active in a community that was very small. It took a lot of courage for Rohrbacher to take them on.

Murray says he’d read about similar cases here at the Underground Bunker. “As you well know, this issue of the employer utilizing Scientology practices has been litigated in other federal cases,” he says.

He also gave us some specifics about the case that weren’t in the complaint. At one point, he says, Rohrbacher was subjected to an exercise where she had to stare at her supervisor.

Yes, that’s Scientology all right, we told him.

“The other one was bullbaiting, where one employee yells derogatory terms at the others participating in the meeting,” Murray says.

We pointed out to Murray that a number of employees around the country have succeeded in these claims. We wondered why more didn’t sue.

“I think some people are a little embarrassed,” Murray says. “Ms. Rohrbacher was a in a very small town. You don’t want to just destroy yourself. And in this case, Teton Therapy was very active in its town.”

Well, we hope the people in Rohrbacher’s town now have second thoughts about patronizing a business that bullbaits its employees.

Congratulations, Ms. Rohrbacher and Steven Murray.

UPDATE: We just looked up the counsel for Teton Therapy and found something interesting. Its attorney for this case was Tara Nethercott, who is a Wyoming State Senator. And, we read, is on the short list of Republicans to run for Congress this year to replace Liz Cheney, who might run for the US Senate and open up the US House seat, the only one the state has.

Author Steven Hassan misleads the media while criticizing others for doing the same

Steven Hassan, author of the “The Cult of Trump,” a book that is very critical of those who mislead people, seems to have a problem with the facts himself. Hypocritically, Hassan lambasts President Trump for distorting the truth, while he deliberately conflates his own CV with false claims of professional status and even a fictional medal of honor.

Hassan says that he is a teacher and/or instructor at both Harvard Medical School and Harvard Law School. However, Harvard University does not list Steven Hassan as occupying any official teaching position through its faculty locator. In fact, Steven Hassan is not even so much as mentioned anywhere on the Harvard University website.

Hassan apparently deliberately misled multiple media outlets about his professional status. WMNF Radio host Rob Lorei states at the broadcast’s official website that “Hassan now teaches at Harvard Medical School.” The Daily Beast also reported that Steven Hassan “teaches at Harvard Medical School.” And The Daily Mail in the UK describes him as “Harvard Medical School teacher Steven Hassan.”

Hassan’s CV specifically states that he is “Member of the Program in Psychiatry and the Law at Massachusetts Mental Health Center- A teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School.” Hassan also states that he was a “participant” at a Harvard Law School “workshop.” But participating in a program or a workshop does not confer any official teaching status upon Hassan at Harvard.

Hassan’s Facebook page shows a photo of him apparently volunteering at a Harvard program. But again, volunteering is not the same as having a faculty appointment as an instructor or as a teacher at Harvard University.

Hassan’s CV lists Harvard several times, notably Harvard Law School. Hassan states that he was a “participant in Trial Advocacy Expert Witness Workshop.” On his Facebook page Hassan says he has been an “instructor” at Harvard Law School five times rather than simply a “participant.” Interestingly, Hassan doesn’t list any expert witness work or any court jurisdiction where he has been qualified, accepted and testified as an expert witness on his CV.

There is a Trial Advocacy Workshop at Harvard with an expert witness component, but Steven Hassan isn’t mentioned anywhere in the workshop description, which denotes the inclusion of “experienced trial lawyers and judges who teach as volunteers during the workshop.”

CultNews contacted Harvard University directly for comment. The Office of Faculty Affairs at Harvard Medical School responded unequivocally that there is “no record of Steven Hassan currently holding or having held in the past a faculty appointment at the medical school.” That is, despite the fact that there are thousands of full- and part-time faculty members consisting of assistant, associate, full professors and part-time instructors, Steven Hassan is not and has never been one of them. Melody Jackson, spokesperson for Harvard Law School, told CultNews that Hassan has never held any faculty appointed teaching position as an “instructor” at Harvard Law School.

Update: Steven Hassan has been busy apparently doing “damage control.” The day after this CultNews report appeared Hassan apparently sought and received a one-page letter from the Massachusetts Mental Health Center (75 Fenwood Road in Boston), which was subsequently posted on Facebook (the link is now restricted though CultNews has a copy). The letter is signed by Angie Mines, Residency Program Coordinator. The letter consists of one short paragraph. Ms. Mines writes that Hassan has been “teaching an elective course” for psychiatric residents. Addressed “To Whom This May Concern” Mines states, “If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.” CultNews contacted Ms Mines who seemed surprised that her letter was posted online. When asked specific questions such as is Steven Hassan paid to teach? And is teaching at the Harvard affiliated Longwood Hospital the same as “teaching at Harvard Medical School”? Ms. Mines replied, “I will have to talk to the program director.” Ms. Mines later concluded in an email, “As advised by my supervisors, I’m not going to be providing any further information.” Mines has since requested that her name and contact information be removed from her letter, which is now linked from Hassan’s website. Hassan later posted a letter signed by a doctor that says he has been “a valued invited presenter” at a Harvard affiliated hospital where the doctor co-teaches a course. Steven Hassan has also added a link to a video of one of those presentations. Apparently, Hassan has been a volunteer at the hospital as a guest speaker for a classes there. Steven Hassan has also recently recruited people to email CultNews in an apparent effort to pressure CultNews to remove this article. Hassan now insists that he is “teaching at programs that are part of Harvard Medical School” [see “The Truth About Steven Hassan”]. However, no one from Harvard Medical School confirms his claim. None of the letters posted confirm this claim and more specifically, certainly not Harvard Medical School.

But Hassan does have at least one proven personal and professional link to Harvard Medical School.

Steven Hassan’s wife Misia Landau who received a PhD in anthropology from Yale University and a Diploma in human biology from Oxford University, taught at Harvard prior to becoming a senior science writer at Harvard Medical School. Landau left her position at Harvard in 2009.

Hassan received his Masters degree from Cambridge College, which features online education. The college has a branch near Harvard. Hassan says he is currently working on a PhD from Fielding Graduate University, which is also known for its distance online educational programs.

Hassan also lists Boston University School of Medicine, but not specifically as an employer. It appears that he may have done volunteer talks at some hospital programs, again without any official status.

Steven Hassan is licensed as a Mental Health Counselor by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. But it must be noted that a serious complaint was filed against Hassan by a former client. The Massachusetts licensing board charged Hassan with an ethical violation for breaching client confidentiality. Hassan was prosecuted, but ultimately the matter was dismissed without prejudice in November 2012. The board warned Hassan that any further failure to adhere to its ethical standards might “result in disciplinary action against [his] license.”

In addition to Hassan’s ethical lapses and conflated teaching status at Harvard he also claims to have received a nonexistent medal of honor. At his CV under the heading “Honors” Hassan lists the so-called “Jerusalem Medal,” which he implies was awarded to him by the Director General of the Israel Ministry of Social Affairs.

In fact, there is no such honor known as the “Jerusalem Medal” awarded to anyone by the Israeli Ministry of Social Affairs.

In 2010 the Israeli agency’s Director General Nahum Itzkovitz visited the United States and while in New York he gave out a few token gifts of appreciation to some people that were helpful to his research. CultNews has what Hassan calls a “Jerusalem Medal” sitting on an office shelf, but it’s merely a souvenir memento with the word “Jerusalem” engraved on a small metal medallion displayed on a little wooden stand. It has a sticker on the back, which says that it’s a “gift” from Director General Itzkovitz.

Steven Hassan seems to have penchant for conflating his CV and also behaving badly with clients. CultNews has received many complaints over the years.

Cult leaders often conflate their biographies in an effort to impress people and are known for their ethical lapses. Hassan’s attempt to mislead the media and public, while simultaneously criticizing others for deception, is really rather rich isn’t it?

More information about Steven Hassan

Serious complaints about cult specialist Steven Hassan

Cult Watcher Steve Hassan’s links to fugitive sex offender

Steve Hassan fans want “information control”

Third installment of Steven Hassan’s trilogy adds little understanding

Disclaimer regarding Steve Hassan

Postscript: Steven Hassan has changed his CV since this report was published online (CultNews has screenshots and a printed copy of the original). He has somewhat softened his claims concerning any official teaching status at Harvard. Hassan has also changed his “Honors” heading to “Honors and Awards” and added that his so-called “Jerusalem Medal” was “given with gratitude.” However, Hassan still won’t admit that he never received a “medal,” only a souvenir gift, which has no special status or meaningful significance to credibly list on his CV. Hassan has also apparently encouraged a number of his devoted supporters to post as his seeming surrogates on Facebook in an attempt to discredit this report. However, CultNews firmly stands by its reporting and fact checking.

‘Australian recruits have dwindled to virtually zero’: Scientology struggles in NSW

Scientology describes itself as the world’s fastest-growing religion but the organisation’s numbers in NSW are dwindling with the church reliant on overseas devotees, defectors claim.

The organisation has properties worth millions across the CBD, Chatswood and Dundas and in 2017, doubled its national revenue to nearly $40 million, the latest published financial records show. But it is struggling to find new recruits in Sydney, defector Paul Schofield said.

“Australian recruits have dwindled to virtually zero as media coverage and access to the Internet has ensured the truth about the cult is well-known here,” Mr Schofield said.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/australian-recruits-have-dwindled-to-virtually-zero-scientology-struggles-in-nsw-20190112-p50qzy.html

Woman Cult Leader From China claims to be the Second Coming of Jesus Christ!

“……. blasphemy, because you, a mere man(human), claim to be God.”   (John 10:33)

 

First off, Jesus is NOT a Woman and never will be! This is just more idiocy perpetrated by Satan to get millions of Feminists to follow this Silly Woman!

EASTERN LIGHTNING: Female Leader Yang Xiangbin Of The Church of Almighty God Cult In China Claims To Be The ‘Second Coming Of Christ’

 December 22, 2018 The Church of Almighty God has a presence in Hong Kong, New York, and San Francisco, as well as mainland China. There are disturbing reports of the group using sexual seduction, kidnapping, bribes, brainwashing, and blackmail to coerce new members into the group and keep them there. The group especially targets housewives, the poor, and house churches in China, first befriending believers and then slowly trying to convince them that Yang Xiangbin is God incarnate.

The group especially targets housewives, the poor, and house churches in China, first befriending believers and then slowly trying to convince them that Yang Xiangbin is God incarnate.

If you ever wondered what a Chinese version of Mormonism would look like, wonder no more. Calling themselves the Church of Almighty God, also known as Eastern Lightning, this cult started in China back in 1991 has taken on new life in the social media age. Its founder is a woman named Yang Xiangbin, and along with her partner in crime Zhao Weishan, they oversee cult operations here in the United States since 2000. Xiangbin bills herself as the ‘christ’ for the Kingdom Age, which she says has already replaced the Church Age.

“And Jesus answered and said unto them, Take heed that no man deceive you. For many shall come in my name, saying, I am Christ; and shall deceive many.” Matthew 24:4,5 (KJV)

The website for the Church of Almighty God contains dozens of videos and books for sale that serve to ‘update’ the useless old book known as the Bible that to them has become nothing more than an ‘obsolete historical record’. Again, very similar to Mormonism with their “other testament” of Jesus Christ. Like Mormonism, the Church of Almighty God was started by criminals who are running a con game. Their leaders are in the US because they were driven out of China just like Joseph Smith was driven out of Ohio and Missouri.

So the next time some deluded cult follower of the Church of Almighty God posts their nonsense to one of your social media groups, grab the link to this article and answer them with the truth. Tell them that Jesus Christ is the only Saviour, and that His shed blood on the cross still saves. Tell them that Yang Xiangbin is not an ‘incarnation of God’ but is in fact a lost, Hell-bound sinner headed for the Lake of Fire.

 

https://www.exposingsatanism.org/chinese-bimbo-claims-to-be-the-second-coming-of-jesus-christ/

 

‘Devil Next Door,’ new A&E series to take closer look at controversial Word of Faith Fellowship Church

 

 

The A&E Network is set to begin airing a new, six-part original docu-series on Tuesday night called “The Devil Next Door” based on the decades old controversial evangelical sect, Word of Faith Fellowship Church in Spindale, North Carolina.

“’The Devil Next Door’ takes a look at Spindale, North Carolina. It appears to be an average American town but hidden inside lies a church that is steeped in scandal,” a summary of the series begins on A&E.

“The Word of Faith Fellowship, led by Jane Whaley, proclaims to be a devout Christian church, but former members tell a different story: one of violence and exploitation. It’s the mission of these former members to convince those still inside, including their own loved ones and children, to break away from the church. Is Jane’s power finally about to come to an end?” it ends.

The six-part series will air on A&E starting at 10 p.m. EST on Tuesday. Episodes will air weekly through Dec. 18 and then the last two episodes will air in January 2019, the Times News Online said.

“We have interviewed or spoken with about 30 ex-members over the entire period we’ve been working on the project. Some did not want to participate on camera but were willing to speak to our producers and share their stories. The six episodes do focus on the stories of six specific ex-members who have opened up their lives to us,” Melissa Koshir, senior manager of publicity for A&E, told Times News Online.

Word of Faith Fellowship Church, founded by Jane Whaley and her husband, Sam, in 1979, describes itself as a nondenominational, Protestant church with classical Christian conservative beliefs. It also operates Word of Faith Christian School.

Officials from the cable network like Elaine Frontain Bryant, executive vice president and head of programming for A&E, said the victims of the church will provide powerful testimony in the series which they hope will help to convince their loved ones who still remain a part of the church to break free.

“A&E Network prides itself in finding truth and conviction through powerful storytelling,” Bryant told Times News Online. “The victims of the Word of Faith Fellowship Church have shocking and timely first-hand accounts that need to be shared and A&E is proud to provide them this very necessary platform so we can ensure their voices will be heard.”

Last summer, officials in Brazil and the U.S. announced that they were investigating Word of Faith Fellowship Church after the sect was accused of enticing young members of the Brazilian branch of their church to come to the U.S. on tourist and student visas, then coercing them to work illegally “like slaves” with little or no pay.

Prior to the announcement of the federal investigation, 16 Brazilians alleged in an Associated Press report that they were forced to work “like slaves” while in the U.S. after being lured with the chance of coming to America to sightsee as tourists or study.

“Everybody knew these trips were not about tourism,” Paulo Henrique Barbosa, 23, who now works in information technology in Sao Paolo, told the AP. “I didn’t want to go, but I had no choice.”

https://www.christianpost.com/news/devil-next-door-new-ae-series-take-closer-look-controversial-word-of-faith-fellowship-church.html